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STRENGTH 

5 Rounds:
1 Push Press
2 Push Jerk
3 Split Jerk
Build to Heavy AF
Rest as needed 

METCON  

AMRAP 25:
20/15 Calorie Row
7 Box Jumps (24/20)
7 Chest to B...

WOD-3.3.18is

March 3, 2018

1/3
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Featured Posts

WOD-4.16.18

April 16, 2018

STRENGTH 

 

Back Squat + Tempo

Build to a moderate-heavy 5 rep in 10 minutes.

 

Then..

 

Back Squat

5x3 Tempo (13X1)

 

Use same weight as heavy 5

 

METCON 

 

2 rounds

60/40 Cal Row or 50/30 Cal Bike
50 Wall Ball Shots (30/20 lbs)
40 Alternating Dumbbell Snatches (50/35 
30 Pull-Ups
20 Handstand Push-Ups 
100 Double Unders
Rest 5 minutes 

 

 

 

 

Tempo Reps meaning:

 

What Does 30X0 Mean?

Tempo prescriptions come in a series of four numbers representing the times in which it should take to complete four stages of the lift. In a workout, the tempo prescription will follow the assigned number of reps, such as:

Front Squat x 2-3 reps @ 30X0

The First Number – The first number refers to the lowering (eccentric) phase of the lift. Using our front squat example, the 3 will represent the amount of time (in seconds) that it should take you to descend to the bottom of the squat. (The first number always refers to the lowering/eccentric phase, even if the movement begins with the ascending/concentric phase, such as in a pull-up.)

The Second Number – The second number refers to the amount of time spent in the bottom position of the lift – the point in which the lift transitions from lowering to ascending. In our front squat example, the prescribed 0 means that the athlete should reach the bottom position and immediately begin their ascent. If, however, the prescription was 32X0, the athlete would be expected to pause for 2 seconds at the bottom position.

The Third Number – The third number refers to ascending (concentric) phase of the lift – the amount of time it takes you to get to the top of the lift. Yes, I am aware that X is not a number. The X signifies that the athlete should EXPLODE the weight up as quickly as possible. In many cases, this will not be very fast, but it is the intent that counts – try to accelerate the weight as fast as you can. If the third number is a 2, it should take the athlete 2 seconds to get the lift to the top regardless of whether they are capable of moving it faster.

The Fourth Number – The fourth number refers to how long you should pause at the top of the lift. Take, for example, a weighted pull-up prescription of 20X2, the athlete would be expected to hold his or her chin over the bar for two seconds before beginning to come down.

Counting – It seems silly to even mention how to count seconds, but I have heard many clients audibly count to 4 in less than one second while under a heavy load. So, to ensure that your 4 second count and mine are the same, use “one thousands,” as in: 1-one thousand, 2-one thousand, 3-one thousand, 4-one thousand. 

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